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Beneficial Effects of Citrus Flavonoids on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health (Perhaps helpful for Myocarditis And Heart Issues)

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I’ve mentioned citrus bioflavonoids in several places on the forum but not many have taken interest ( it seems)nor understood their importance ( in regards to Covid 19)

Given that a lot of people are suffering secondary myocarditis and various heart issues being around covid 19 vaccinated individuals, the use of bioflavonoids and citrus bioflavonoids may be helpful. I myself have been using them as a preventative measure. I use citrus bioflavonoids and Citrus Bergamot.


“ The history of citrus bioflavonoids began in 1936 when the Nobel-prize-winning scientist Albert Szent-Gyorgi discovered bioflavonoids. An expert on vitamin C, he originally dubbed the group of citrus bioflavonoids “vitamin P.”5

However, thousands of bioflavonoids have been discovered since 1936. They are organized according to their chemical structures.

As is the case with vitamin C, citrus bioflavonoids come from various sources. There are several different kinds of citrus bioflavonoids. The most common are hesperidin, nobiletin, naringin, hesperetin, and naringenin.”


Bioflavonoids are found in the rind of green citrus fruits and in rose hips and black currants.

* I also use a supplement called “grape seed extract” which comes from grape seeds and has been mentioned as helpful for the cardiovascular system as well.


Beneficial Effects of Citrus Flavonoids on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health​


“The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing over time. CVD is a comorbidity in diabetes and contributes to premature death. Citrus flavonoids possess several biological activities and have emerged as efficient therapeutics for the treatment of CVD. Citrus flavonoids scavenge free radicals, improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, modulate lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation, suppress inflammation and apoptosis, and improve endothelial dysfunction. The intake of citrus flavonoids has been associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Although citrus flavonoids exerted multiple beneficial effects, their mechanisms of action are not completely established. In this review, we summarized recent findings and advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of citrus flavonoids against oxidative stress, inflammation, diabetes, dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. Further studies and clinical trials to assess the efficacy and to explore the underlying mechanism(s) of action of citrus flavonoids are recommended.”


I won’t post the whole article because it is long,
but you can read it here: (from The National Library Of Medicine)

Beneficial Effects of Citrus Flavonoids on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health

As I said, this might be a helpful addition to those suffering from myocarditis and secondary myocarditis by association.
 
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Peatness

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Thanks. Citrus flavonoid naringenin is very popular round here. Oranges, marmalade, and there’s even a supplement.

 

FocusedOnHealth

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“Flavonoids are plant-based natural products that are very abundant and have multiple therapeutic benefits and biological activities. This diverse group of compounds exerts antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, anticarcinogenic, antihyperammonemia, nephroprotective, and hepatoprotective activities as we reported previously [2129]. The basic structure of flavonoids involves 15-carbon atoms and 2 phenolic rings carrying one or more hydroxyl group (OH). According to their structure, flavonoids could be divided into 6 classes: flavanones, flavones, flavanols, isoflavones, flavonols, and anthocyanidins [30]. There are thousands of food flavonoid compounds existing in aglycone form or bound to glycosides [31, 32]. Dietary flavonoids in nature exist as glycosides, such as, glucoside, galactoside, arabinoside, rhamnoside, and rutinoside [33, 34]. All dietary flavonoids except flavanols are found in glycosylated forms [35], and deglycosylation is a critical step in the absorption and metabolism of flavonoid glycosides [36]. The flavonoid glycosides are water-soluble, whereas aglycones are more hydrophobic and can be easily absorbed [32, 37, 38]. Within the small intestine, only aglycones and some glucosides can be absorbed; however, flavonoids linked to a rhamnose moiety must be hydrolyzed by rhamnosidases of the microflora in the large intestine [39, 40]. The flavonoid glycosides are then absorbed, bound to albumin, and transported to the liver via the portal vein [4143]. The intrahepatic metabolism of flavonoids is influenced by different factors [31], and flavonoids and their derivatives may undergo hydroxylation, methylation, and reduction [42]. Citrus fruits are notably rich in flavonoid compounds and represent an important source of dietary flavonoids, including hesperidin, hesperetin, naringin, naringenin, diosmin, quercetin, rutin, nobiletin, tangeretin, and others (Figure 1). These flavonoids are present in many citrus fruits, such as, bergamots, grapefruit, lemons, limes, mandarins, oranges, and pomelos [44]. The health-related effects of citrus flavonoids have been reported in several studies. Among their biological activities, citrus flavonoids possess radical scavenging, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Given the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CVD, including DCM, and atherosclerosis, we aim in this review to focus on the mechanisms of action of citrus flavonoids in oxidative stress, diabetes, DCM, lipid metabolism, adipose tissue inflammation, ED, platelet function, and atherosclerosis.”
 

FocusedOnHealth

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Thanks. Citrus flavonoid naringenin is very popular round here. Oranges, marmalade, and there’s even a supplement.

Yes. The Bioflavonoid supplements I take have naringenin as well as Hesperiden, rutin.
 

FocusedOnHealth

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Thanks. Citrus flavonoid naringenin is very popular round here. Oranges, marmalade, and there’s even a supplement.

Marmalade has the orange rinds in it, correct? Oh and thanks for posting that link, never saw that
 

Peatness

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Marmalade has the orange rinds in it, correct? Oh and thanks for posting that link, never saw that
Yes. Someone recently posted a recipe for orange rind powder. That will be high in naringenin
 

FocusedOnHealth

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Yes. Someone recently posted a recipe for orange rind powder. That will be high in naringenin
Hi, thank you sharing...which bioflavanoid supplement do you use?
I use three different products which I rotate…Citrus Bergamot, a Citrus bioflavonoid from Bluebonnet, and another Citrus Bioflavonoid product from a company called CLAV. They are supposed to be good for blood sugar as well.
 

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Nice, thanks for sharing. What made you decide on these two brands?
Well Blue Bonnet has a good reputation as a supplement company, and I chose CLAV because it had a combination of various bioflavonoids such as Diosmin,Hesperidin, Grapefruit extract, Naringin. Hesperidin has been mentioned as a supplement that is helpful for Covid 19 and cadiovascular protection.


I was taking just Hesperidin when Covid first hit. Seemed to keep me healthy. EDIT: along with, zinc, vit C, quercertin, and other various vitamins & supplements specifically for keeping my immunity up.
oh also too oregano oil, olive leaf extract stuff like that..

i take olive leaf extract on a weekly basic for immunity
 
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Sefton10

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New Research: Naringin Interferes Doxorubicin-Induced Myocardial Injury by Promoting the Expression of ECHS1

 

FocusedOnHealth

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New Research: Naringin Interferes Doxorubicin-Induced Myocardial Injury by Promoting the Expression of ECHS1

Thanks for that :blush::thumbsup:
 

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