Beets Vs Raw Carrot Or Activated Charcoal

Discussion in 'Vegetables, Grains, Legumes, Fiber' started by johns74, Nov 18, 2014.

  1. johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    One of the benefits of the raw carrot is that it binds to bile acids, which helps to excrete them with the toxins they contain.

    Here's a paper testing how much different vegetables bind to bile acids, in vitro. Beets bind to bile acids a bit more than twice as carrots.

    Link

    Note: Bile acids binding helps to eliminate PFOA and other PFCs (plastic toxins).
     
  2. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    Time to experiment with beet and carrot salad?

    I don't know where to get okra.
     
  3. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2014
    Messages:
    6,377
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Uganda
    I wouldn't. They ferment much easier than carrots in our gut.
    Interesting to note that Beetroot is contains fructans, so in the Low-FODMAPs diet, they advise to consume with caution.
     
  4. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    Well, I just had a shredded carrot with a little shredded beetroot, will see what happens.

    Raw beetroot binds 10 times more bile than raw carrot, according to the study.

    The numbers in the OP refer to steamed presentations, not raw.
     
  5. lindsay

    lindsay Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2013
    Messages:
    974
    Occupation:
    Photographer
    Location:
    United States
    Beets are also really good for the liver. But eating them raw????? Yuck!

    Just make borsch or salat vinaigrette :)
     
  6. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    It tasted fairly acceptable. Should've had more.
     
  7. lindsay

    lindsay Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2013
    Messages:
    974
    Occupation:
    Photographer
    Location:
    United States
    Every time I've tried to eat raw beets in the past, I felt like I was eating dirt. However, I could imagine pickling them first would make them much more palatable. Cooked beets, however, are delicious!
     
  8. tara

    tara Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    9,818
    Gender:
    Female
    Salad made of grated carrot, grated beetroot, and sometimes grated apple was a reasonably common dish in my household and town long before I heard of Peat. It's really good. I can't stand too much cooked beetroot, but raw like this is delicious. I could tell I felt better for it. I probably couldn't eat it every day, though. Maybe rinsing the grated beetroot, like I do with carrot, would make it possible for me to eat more frequently.
     
  9. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    I saw recipes online. There's your natural PFOA and PFC detox that the internet isn't even aware exists (teflon stays in your body forever, they claim, or half life is 4 years).

    My guess that is sort of the perfect combination. Bile contains bicarbonate, so if the beetroot excretes it, maybe the apples there come in and act like a precursor to create bicarbonate or keep the pH high some other way.
     
  10. tara

    tara Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    9,818
    Gender:
    Female
    Wonder if it's any better for dragging out the lead and mercury than just the carrot.
     
  11. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    The paper says more bile binds to the raw beets than to the raw carrot, 10 times more, so I guess it's more effective. Whether it removes heavy metals, it depends I think on whether bile contains them. I think bile contains lead, don't know how much though. But for PFOA and PFCs, bile is the main excretion mechanism.

    You can also get rid of heavy metals I believe by sweating. In contrast, PFCs aren't eliminated through sweat.
     
  12. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    After taking the grated beet and carrot salad for two days, my subjective feeling is that it's more powerful than the carrot alone. But I still have to do a lot of variations of amounts, oils, or added salt to see how I like it best.

    I think it might excrete a significant amount of bicarbonate from the bile, so one might want to avoid acidic foods for a few hours, or eat fruits to rebuild the bicarbonate in the blood.
     
  13. BingDing

    BingDing Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    895
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Tennessee, USA
    Just cause I happen to know this, beets have about the highest level of betaine of any food. Betaine is one of the best compounds for getting fat out of the liver and keeping it out.
     
  14. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    7,521
    Gender:
    Female
    Great tip BingDing!
     
  15. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    I think I had too much. After using the grated carrot and beetroot salad 3 times in 5 days, I feel weak and without energy. I think it excreted too much bile, and that includes nutrients, maybe taurine.
     
  16. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2013
    Messages:
    7,364
    Carrots and charcoal aren't enough?

    <<[...]the theoretical maximum capacity of activated carbon is about 0.9g bile acid to 1g carbon. [...]

    Bile acids are clearly avidly absorbed in vitro by activated carbon, and its capacity is similar to that of cholestyramine. [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7392829] [...]

    In other human studies by Neuvonen et al. activated carbon has been dosed at levels from 4 to 32 g a day. They determined that a dose of 32 g a day reduced total cholesterol by 29% and LDL cholesterol by 41%. In addition, the level of HDL cholesterol was increased by an average 27%.>> [http://books.google.it/books?hl=it&lr=&id=Q14e1veUp90C&oi=fnd&pg=PA15&dq=active+carbon+sequestrant&ots=e8XDDccC0v&sig=EHEy8g9AceG6vp29DF2n0G_IAPY#v=onepage&q=active%20carbon%20sequestrant&f=false]
     
  17. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    I haven't used charcoal.
     
  18. OP
    johns74

    johns74 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    501
    Now I have a reason to at least suspect that beets are a bad idea to use instead of activated charcoal.

    It's because the safety of charcoal is better documented. While there haven't been similar studies with beets, the fact that they contain oxalates makes me more cautious. Oxalates bind to minerals, including magnesium. In one study, charcoal didn't produce magnesium deficiency. Beets potentially could bind more magnesium, which is secreted in bile, and typically reabsorbed in part. The reabsorption is regulated by our need for magnesium at that moment, but the oxalates could theoretically block it. Maybe the same could happen with other minerals.
     
  19. ddjd

    ddjd Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2014
    Messages:
    2,891
    link to study doesnt seem to be working
     
Loading...