Beef Liver/ Chicken Liver?

Discussion in 'Organ Meat' started by rachelmc, May 29, 2015.

  1. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    I think freshness is more important than if it's ruminant or non-ruminant liver.
    Taste is the king here. Nutritiondata shows very little PUFA in chicken liver and
    i would not worry if there is no visible fat deposits inside the liver.
    I have read studies that found frozen animal meats had higher oxidation of fat and
    cholesterol if those were fed PUFA instead of saturated fat.

    I think there is uncertainty how those organic frozen livers were stored and for how long.
    Are those sold in vacuum pack?
    Kummerow puts a lot of emphasis on oxidized cholesterol.
    Cholesterol in ground meats get oxidized even when it is stored
    at freezing temperature. Exposure of air increases oxidation.
    I used to make liver pate and ate it for 3-4 days. Traditionally
    people makes an oil seal on top of liver pate to prevent oxidation.
    The only reason i chose beef liver is that RP measured the amount
    of total vitamin K in beef liver. There is at least 200 mcg per 100 grams.
    They showed about 15 mcg in 100 mg of chicken liver. It is also possible
    they made a mistake in measuring total K like they did with beef liver.
    Goose liver pate has more than 300 mcg per 100 grams.
     
  2. tara

    tara Member

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    My experience is that liver tastes dry if it's overcooked (and tastes bad if it's too old). Fresh (or fresh frozen and thawed before frying), lightly cooked, it's sweet and juicy. :)
     
  3. YuraCZ

    YuraCZ Member

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    I cook without adding fat so it's always dry. But I agree. If it's overcooked it becomes super dry..
     
  4. tara

    tara Member

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    Yeah, I guess that makes a difference. I use just a little coconut oil to reduce sticking/burning to the pan. But it's the inside that is sweet and juicy. :)
     
  5. YuraCZ

    YuraCZ Member

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    I use water for this purpose and then when it's cooked I add collagen with coconut oil and salt..
     
  6. tara

    tara Member

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    I'm not sure, not having tried your method, but I suspect frying in oil seals more of the juiciness in than cooking in water would?
     
  7. YuraCZ

    YuraCZ Member

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    Maybe but I don't care about the taste so much. I want to avoid too much frying. I think it's not good for health at all. I fry the eggs every day. It's enough.
     
  8. tara

    tara Member

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    I expect that you are right about fried food having some down sides, so if you like it your way, that's great. My guess is the liver is a nutritional net benefit either way. For people who don't like liver enough to be able to eat it at all, finding a way that tastes good might make a difference.
     
  9. narouz

    narouz Member

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    You know, Mittir,
    if I could find a halfway decent source for chicken livers I would eat them.
    But at the "healthfood stores,"
    they have healthy chicken,
    but not chicken livers.

    Thing is, with beef liver,
    while I can regularly find high quality grassfed beef liver,
    I tend to buy it,
    bring it home,
    let it set in the frig...procrastinate...don't eat it.
    I'm obviously avoiding it because I don't much like it.
    Probably better if I actually Eat a lesser quality liver!

    I see you've looked into Kummerow.
    I heard Peat and the Herb Doctors talking about him, briefly.
    Funny how about the only starch in his diet
    seemed to be the "small piece of baked potato."
    I guess he avoids starch, pretty much.
     
  10. tara

    tara Member

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    I like liver, so not quite the same situation, but I wonder if this method, separating the prep and storage from the eating, would help not have your reluctance to eat lots of liver cause such waste?

    I try not to leave the fresh liver in the fridge till the next day, but get it out, chop it into bite sized pieces with scissors, freeze the bits in ice cube trays, then when frozen tip them all into a container in the freezer. Doesn't require eating any until you are ready, but keeps it fresh when for when you are.

    I don't enjoy a large serving, so I just get out a few bites at a time, usually the day before, leave them to thaw in a bit of milk or water (improves the taste a little). Then fry them up for breakfast. Or you can thaw them quickly in a microwave if you want to be more spontaneous. And then if you don't get round to eating those few pieces, you haven't wasted the whole lot (and your cat will be happy - you have a cat, right?).
     
  11. narouz

    narouz Member

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    That sounds like a wonderful approach, tara. :D

    I was, actually, being quite successful with eating beef liver
    when I was making it into pate with a food processor.
    But...I confess...I really needed some crackers.
     
  12. tara

    tara Member

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    Yeah, I had a go at making pate a couple of times, and I liked it best on rice wafers with lots of butter. :)
     
  13. OP
    rachelmc

    rachelmc New Member

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    Thank you everyone! I will try chicken liver first as I can get it easier than beef liver :)
     
  14. narouz

    narouz Member

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    I think freshness is more important than if it's ruminant or non-ruminant liver.
    Taste is the king here. Nutritiondata shows very little PUFA in chicken liver and
    i would not worry if there is no visible fat deposits inside the liver.
    I have read studies that found frozen animal meats had higher oxidation of fat and
    cholesterol if those were fed PUFA instead of saturated fat.

    I think there is uncertainty how those organic frozen livers were stored and for how long.
    Are those sold in vacuum pack?
    Kummerow puts a lot of emphasis on oxidized cholesterol.
    Cholesterol in ground meats get oxidized even when it is stored
    at freezing temperature. Exposure of air increases oxidation.
    I used to make liver pate and ate it for 3-4 days. Traditionally
    people makes an oil seal on top of liver pate to prevent oxidation.
    The only reason i chose beef liver is that RP measured the amount
    of total vitamin K in beef liver. There is at least 200 mcg per 100 grams.
    They showed about 15 mcg in 100 mg of chicken liver. It is also possible
    they made a mistake in measuring total K like they did with beef liver.
    Goose liver pate has more than 300 mcg per 100 grams.[/quoteMittir"]-

    I've been eating a tub of organic chicken livers per 2 weeks.
    I'm loving it.
    For some reason, I love chicken livers,
    but I...I can get beef liver down...I don't like barf or anything...
    but it is not wonderful.
    Chicken liver is wonderful.
    I hope it doesn't kill me with PUFA. :)
     
  15. tomisonbottom

    tomisonbottom Member

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    How do you prepare chicken liver?
     
  16. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    If one freezes liver, the Vit K is destroyed.
     
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