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Aspirin (but Not Other NSAID) Treats Barrett’s Esophagus And Possibly GERD

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Apr 29, 2017.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The good news for aspirin just keep on coming. I posted a few studied in the past about GERD and its progressions Barrett’s esophagus, and esophageal cancer being caused by inflammation and not stomach acid. As such, PPI drugs are probably useless for treating and preventing GERD (since they target the wrong mechanism) and anti-inflammatory substances are expected to be helpful. This is exactly what has been observed over the last 40 years - i.e. up to 10-fold increase in Barrett's and esophageal cancer despite virtually everyone being put on PPI at some point in their life, while at the same time substances with potent anti-inflammatory effects like glycine showing therapeutic effects for both GERD and its associated complications.

    GERD (acid Reflux) Is Caused By Inflammation, Not Stomach Acid
    Glycine Can Completely Prevent Esophagus Damage Caused By GERD

    Of course, glycine is not the only substance that can lower of block inflammation and several small clinical trials were conducted to see if NSAID drugs would also show benefit. The results for all of them were mixed, but none of them used aspirin. Now, this study shows that aspirin and aspirin only can treat the pre-cancerous condition Barrett’s Esophagus and prevent progression into esophageal cancer. The study did not look at aspirin's effects on already established cancer cases, or whether aspirin can reverse GERD as well, but judging from glycine's effectiveness on GERD (as per the study above) we can say with relatively certainty that aspirin can at the very least treat GERD as well and possibly even the cancer that develops from these inflammatory conditions. In light of this new evidence I really see no reason to use PPI drugs, as @aguilaroja and myself have posted so many times. A combination of aspirin and famotidine is much more likely to be both safer and effective at treating any of the the triad GERD->Barrett’s->cancer. And famotodine used to be given in combination with aspirin to protect from the irritation aspirin can cause to the GI tract, so this combination could be much more valuable then recently approved poisons like Yosprala (https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM524808.pdf).


    http://gut.bmj.com/content/early/2017/04/25/gutjnl-2016-313584
    http://www.newswise.com/articles/study-finds-aspirin-may-help-prevent-barrett-s-esophagus

    "...Aspirin has long been used to help prevent and manage heart disease. However, researchers at Baylor Scott & White Research Institute have discovered another potential benefit –protection against Barrett’s esophagus, a disorder that causes damage to the esophagus from long-term acid reflux disease, and can help lower associated cancer risk. The report, “Aspirin Prevents NF-κB Activation and CDX2 Expression Stimulated by Acid and Bile Salts in Oesophageal Squamous Cells of Barrett’s Oesophagus Patients,” was recently published in Gut, a top tier peer-reviewed journal."

    We’ve seen a seven-fold increase in the frequency of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the last 40 years. It is relatively uncommon, but with its increasing frequency, it may not remain that way for long,” said author Stuart Spechler, MD, co-director of the Center for Esophageal Research at Baylor Scott & White Research Institute."

    "...While previous data associated NSAIDs, particularly aspirin, with certain GERD protections, the current study was the first to confirm that aspirin alone could inhibit the NF-κB pathway that promotes inflammation and CDX2 expression, which can lead to protection against Barrett’s esophagus."
     
  2. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    I can confirm this anecdotally. Tremendously helps along with niacinimide and that new product Koveras highlighted - Alantril.
     
  3. Birdie

    Birdie Member

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    @haidut Thank you for this.
    @lisaferraro Have you experience personally? Did you comment on it somewhere?
     
  4. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    Hi @Birdie, I was using aspirin 2x325mg tablets with milk over about a 10 day period for sleep and estrogen reduction during a super stressful time. The side benefit? My stomach got sooooo much better. I was pleasantly surprised. Now I also tried once Tubzy's suggestion about niacinimide-for three days used 1500mg all at once with coffee and morning smoothie. Really helped. And finally just tried the Alantril Koveras mentioned and WoW - almost totally healed!!
     
  5. G Forrest

    G Forrest Member

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    Thanks @haidut . I was diagnosed with Barrett's Esophagus and gastritis after an endoscopy two year's ago. I tried diet adjustments but still have GERD issues.

    Is there any concern with taking aspirin given the potential for ulcer/bleeding if I have irritation to the stomach like gastritis.
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Adding a little baking soda (1tsp) to the aspirin in a water seems to prevent the negative effects of aspirin on the gastric mucosa. Taking aspirin with about the same amount of glycine (as the aspirin) also seems to prevent/limit the damage.
     
  7. Zpol

    Zpol Member

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    @G Forrest, have you started an aspirin protocol? I am considering an aspirin regimen for GERD and gastritis as well based on @haidut 's post about GERD and gastritis being caused by inflammation, also I have Schatski's ring developing in my esophagus. Looking for anecdotal info if you got it. I do not have H. Pylori so maybe the inflammation is the cause.

    I'm not sure of the safety of taking baking soda on a regular basis, especially if one is consuming high calcium foods or supplements. I suppose glycine would be a safer adjunctive, but effectiveness is questionable. Gastritis is a sign of low CO2, so theoretically baking soda would help but there's just so many dangers associated with it, including anecdotal stories from members on this forum. So, it's another quandary.
     
  8. Texon

    Texon Member

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    @haidut ditto Birdie
    Haidut could tart cherry juice be just as effective as aspirin per the study linked below? I have similar issues as other posts here, but I react badly to aspirin for some unknown reason. I have never looked at aspirin's effects either way on gout. Thoughts?

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5046019/

     
  9. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I don't know of anything coming close to aspirin in terms of systemic effects, except possibly progesterone and methylene blue. So, it may have benefit for GERD but it is hard to say without more direct comparison in in vivo studies.
     
  10. Ulysses

    Ulysses Member

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    One complication from PPIs is undigested food passing out of the stomach and into the intestines, owing to the reduction of stomach acid production. Couldn't baking soda theoretically have the same effect, by neutralizing the acid in the stomach?
     
  11. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think it can, if it is taken in high enough dose. For that (and other reasons) taking more than 5g baking soda as a single dose is probably not warranted.
     
  12. lvysaur

    lvysaur Member

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    Does the glycine timing matter?

    Can you have a bunch of glycine in the morning, and take an aspirin in the evening?

    And by the way, is Tocovit in light-proof bottles yet?
     
  13. Ulysses

    Ulysses Member

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    @haidut I have occasional reflux, and based on some reading I’ve done around the forum, I think my go to therapy is going to be a combination of aspirin, glycine, and baking soda. Can you think of any reason why these three things might adversely interact? Seems unlikely to me, but I just want to be sure. I understand that aspirin is technically an acid so perhaps taking it with baking soda Might reduce the effect of both?

    Another thing I’m not quite following in this discussion of aspirin and reflux: does aspirin actually reduce reflux, or does it merely prevent the esophageal damage the reflux causes?

    The strange thing is that since I started Peating, my GERD symptoms have changed. Now, instead of actually feeling acid/regurgitation in My lower esophagus, I don’t feel anything. Instead, I just get water brash, which I never got before. I really have no idea whether this is an improvement.
     
  14. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Aspirin and baking soda are OK but do not mix them with calcium or other dairy as the combination can cause Milk alkali syndrome.
    Milk-alkali syndrome - Wikipedia

    For that reason, I think aspirin/glycine is a safer combination and enough to have benefit considering the already known benefit of glycine for GERD.
    Glycine Can Completely Prevent Esophagus Damage Caused By GERD
     
  15. Jem Oz

    Jem Oz Member

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    @haidut if someone with esophageal damage from GERD was going to try a course of aspirin, do you have any suggestions for dosage and duration?
     
  16. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I can't discuss specific dosages and duration as aspirin has not been used for GERD specifically, but adding gelatin should help limit risk of damage to stomach mucosa.
     
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