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Asking The Butcher For Bones(to make homemade gelatin)

DMF

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Sep 5, 2012
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345
I've never asked a butcher for bones to make homemade broth/gelatin - never made a broth from bones. Should you hack'em into small pieces with a cleever? I've made chicken soup before, skimmed off the fat at the top after refridgeration and all that.
What do you pay $$ for bones? Should you make a separate broth between meat and/or foul, or mix them?
 

nwo2012

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DMF said:
I've never asked a butcher for bones to make homemade broth/gelatin - never made a broth from bones. Should you hack'em into small pieces with a cleever? I've made chicken soup before, skimmed off the fat at the top after refridgeration and all that.
What do you pay $$ for bones? Should you make a separate broth between meat and/or foul, or mix them?

I get mine free. No need to chop up and you can mix animals.
 
R

ratcheer

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The best bones are joints, and sometimes the joint bones are in freezer bags as 'dog bones' (and cheaper/free). Marrow is tasty - but Peat himself is dubious of marrow because of the iron content. He also says bone calcium is a lower-quality source than eggshell, because of potential lead content. The joints also have more gelatin.

Based on the above, when I make bone broth I do NOT split the bones like I used to, and I do not add lemon or vinegar to the broth - the calcium that comes out of the bones is sufficient without also risking too much lead.

If you do want to enjoy all the marrow you can get (I wouldn't blame you), just consume it with a cup of coffee on the side :):
 

DMF

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Now I've got to make friends with some butcher out there. 'Don't know my chances of getting free bones from Whole Foods Market.
Also - how long do you boil'em?
 

nwo2012

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DMF said:
Now I've got to make friends with some butcher out there. 'Don't know my chances of getting free bones from Whole Foods Market.
Also - how long do you boil'em?

I prefer to boil/simmer for no longer than 3 hours as I've read that longer can degrade the aminos. I also remove all the meat to reduce the chance of producing HCAs.
 

DMF

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"...producing HCA's" - what are those? Don't tell me -hydrochloric acids??. Seriously, I don't know. Yes - tell me.
 

nwo2012

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Janelle525 said:
HCA= heterocyclic amines, a chemical created in meat that is over cooked

Thats the one. Its very unlikely with boiling but I still dont like to overcook anything just in case. And anyways the chance of denaturing the aminos is enough not to overcook.
 

charlie

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I really need to get away from using the slow cooker. :banghead
 

nwo2012

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Charlie said:
I really need to get away from using the slow cooker. :banghead

As before the chances of mutagen production is low especially if the meat is well hydrated. But never use your slow cooker for meats (well maybe on occasion is fine) as we lose a lot of the nutrients that way. Raw/lightly cooked meat is best.
 

charlie

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Go figure. Being a single guy, slow cooker was really a good friend to me. Slow cooker, I will miss thee. :doh
 

Combie

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Slow cooker still great for stock. Microwave still great for warming plates..
 

jc.

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Aug 20, 2013
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I thought a slow cooker was pretty low temperature. If you have a meat thermometer, you could check the water temperature. In Japan, they never let the stock for Ramen come to a boil, just a bare simmer. Man, I miss Ramen noodles!
 

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