Asking The Butcher For Bones(to make homemade gelatin)

Discussion in 'Broth, Stocks' started by DMF, Sep 8, 2012.

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  1. DMF

    DMF Member

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    I've never asked a butcher for bones to make homemade broth/gelatin - never made a broth from bones. Should you hack'em into small pieces with a cleever? I've made chicken soup before, skimmed off the fat at the top after refridgeration and all that.
    What do you pay $$ for bones? Should you make a separate broth between meat and/or foul, or mix them?
     
  2. nwo2012

    nwo2012 Member

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    I get mine free. No need to chop up and you can mix animals.
     
  3. ratcheer

    ratcheer Guest

    The best bones are joints, and sometimes the joint bones are in freezer bags as 'dog bones' (and cheaper/free). Marrow is tasty - but Peat himself is dubious of marrow because of the iron content. He also says bone calcium is a lower-quality source than eggshell, because of potential lead content. The joints also have more gelatin.

    Based on the above, when I make bone broth I do NOT split the bones like I used to, and I do not add lemon or vinegar to the broth - the calcium that comes out of the bones is sufficient without also risking too much lead.

    If you do want to enjoy all the marrow you can get (I wouldn't blame you), just consume it with a cup of coffee on the side :):
     
  4. OP
    DMF

    DMF Member

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    Now I've got to make friends with some butcher out there. 'Don't know my chances of getting free bones from Whole Foods Market.
    Also - how long do you boil'em?
     
  5. nwo2012

    nwo2012 Member

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    I prefer to boil/simmer for no longer than 3 hours as I've read that longer can degrade the aminos. I also remove all the meat to reduce the chance of producing HCAs.
     
  6. OP
    DMF

    DMF Member

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    "...producing HCA's" - what are those? Don't tell me -hydrochloric acids??. Seriously, I don't know. Yes - tell me.
     
  7. Birdie

    Birdie Member

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    So, I googled HCA and found Health Care Authority! :)
     
  8. sugarbabe

    sugarbabe Member

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    HCA= heterocyclic amines, a chemical created in meat that is over cooked
     
  9. nwo2012

    nwo2012 Member

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    Thats the one. Its very unlikely with boiling but I still dont like to overcook anything just in case. And anyways the chance of denaturing the aminos is enough not to overcook.
     
  10. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    I really need to get away from using the slow cooker. :banghead
     
  11. nwo2012

    nwo2012 Member

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    As before the chances of mutagen production is low especially if the meat is well hydrated. But never use your slow cooker for meats (well maybe on occasion is fine) as we lose a lot of the nutrients that way. Raw/lightly cooked meat is best.
     
  12. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Go figure. Being a single guy, slow cooker was really a good friend to me. Slow cooker, I will miss thee. :doh
     
  13. Combie

    Combie Member

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    Slow cooker still great for stock. Microwave still great for warming plates..
     
  14. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    I get all my cuts bone in and just save those. We save up the bones in the freezer, along with onion skins and make bone broth when we have enough for a batch saved up. Gristle is gelatin ;)
     
  15. jc.

    jc. New Member

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    I thought a slow cooker was pretty low temperature. If you have a meat thermometer, you could check the water temperature. In Japan, they never let the stock for Ramen come to a boil, just a bare simmer. Man, I miss Ramen noodles!
     
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