Are Tocotrienols Confirmed To Be Bad?

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by BigChad, Jun 28, 2019.

  1. BigChad

    BigChad Member

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    It seems like all the oils/fats which contain tocotrienols are safe ones like macadamia nut oil, coconut and red palm oil. Soybean oil i think has almost no tocotrienols. I was thinking of getting the nutrigold vitamin E supplement to use 4x a week. Everything about it looks good, not too high a dose, mixed tocopherols sourced from sunflower/red palm, but it also has 40mg mixed tocotrienols in it, which may be entirely sourced from red palm oil. So im not sure if i should go for a different vitamin E like the thorne vitamin E
     
  2. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    For anyone interested, the delta tocotrienols, which are devoid of alpha tocopherol such as the DeltaGold brand, have many positive studies. Concerns about estrogen, PUFA , and liver enlargement are not a concern, and this form of vitamin E has benefits far beyond tocopherols. This is the reply I received when questioning the alleged 'liver enlargement' assertions by Peat:
    Hi Dave,


    I have heard back from the team regarding your question below. Here is their response:


    The liver enlargement the forum is referring to is out of context. Liver enlargement was only observed in toxicology studies. Toxicology studies are used to assess the safe dosages of compounds introduced into the food supply. These studies aim to detect the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL), which means that dosages increase from low to very high. One study, for example, found no adverse effects under ~5,000mg tocotrienols (translated animal dosage to a 70kg human), whereas another study found no adverse effects under ~1,000mg (translated human dose). The drawback of some of these studies is that the difference between the intermediate and high dosages are too large, and high dose adverse effects are often due to the oil content of the diet simply being too high for the type of animal studied, which can cause liver enlargement that is entirely unrelated to the study compound (in this case tocotrienol).


    In any case, the statement that tocotrienols have hardly been tested is outdated. We now know that tocotrienols – and not tocopherols – are able to regulate cholesterol synthesis, and as antioxidants, they are ~50-fold as active as tocopherols. Clinical trials have also shown tocotrienols to have a beneficial effect on cardiometabolic, liver, cellular, and bone health. None of these clinical trials have reported any adverse events.


    I hope this helps!


    Kind Regards,

    Kim


    Kim Dunne

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  3. ddjd

    ddjd Member

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    what's the deal with the Unique E product, is that safe to use?
     
  4. Inaut

    Inaut Member

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    So palm oil is ok @Dave Clark ? It’s an affordable source of E and sat fat
     
  5. olive

    olive Member

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    Just eat sweet potato and drink cranberry juice. High vitamin E, low PUFA. No need for supps.
     
  6. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    If you check out the work of Dr. Barrie Tan, he has been studying tocotrienols for 30 years. He recommends annatto based tocotrienols because they have no alpha tocopherols to inhibit the functions/benefits of tocotrienols. One of the reasons you often hear people say to take vitamin E sups 6 hours away from tocotrienols, apparently the alpha tocopherol antagonizes them. Here is Tan's site, you can check out webcasts/podcasts to listen to his story and the science: Home | Dr. Barrie Tan. The best science has been around the delta tocotrienols, which is prominent, if not exclusive in the annatto source. I think the appreciation, understanding, and awareness of tocotrienol's benefits may still be in their infancy.
     
  7. Inaut

    Inaut Member

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    @olive what brand of cranberry juice do you buy? The pure stuff is pretty expensive no?
     
  8. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    If you are looking for the benefits specifically of tocotrienols, you won't find hardly any in common foods. Tocopherols, yes, but if you check out the science, there are different benefits from tocotrienols, and if you desire them, you will need supplementation. If tocotrienols are what interest you, food sources also contain alpha tocopherol which inhibits the function of tocotrienols. Supplements are the way to go when seeking the benefits of tocotrienols, specifically delta tocotrienol from annatto.
     
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