Any Experiences Using Clenbuterol/Salbutamol

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by A.R, Jun 2, 2017.

  1. A.R

    A.R Member

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    I've read online that these drugs help with breathing problems. I was hoping it may help with snoring.

    Thank You
     
  2. sele

    sele Member

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    Both of them raise adrenaline.
    Low CO2 levels will make you snore.
    Try safer options like Diamox or bag breathing.
     
  3. OP
    A.R

    A.R Member

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  4. OP
    A.R

    A.R Member

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    Also ginkgo biloba is a good otc option apparently
     
  5. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    If they raise adrenaline, how does it lead to lower CO2? I'm interested to know since I question the use of salbutamol by doctors even on patients having problem with low serum CO2 levels and suffering from respiratory alkalosis. Even when patients have no asthma nor COPD.

    Thanks.
     
  6. sele

    sele Member

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    Glucose metabolism can result in CO2 or lactic acid depending on chemical variables.

    "Adrenaline tends to decrease carbon dioxide and increase lactic acid, and it strongly increases parathyroid hormone (Ljunhgall S, et al., 1984). " -RP

    "Calcitonin, vitamin D-active metabolite, and estrogen-”HRT” treaments can cause respiratory alkalosis (relative hyperventilation),[19-24] and hypothyroidism produces a predisposition to hyperventilation.[25] Hyperventilation tends to cause calcium loss. In respiratory alkalolis, CO2 (and sometimes bicarbonate) are decreased, impairing calcium retention, and in “metabolic alkalosis,” with increased bicarbonate, calcium is retained more efficiently and bone formation is stimulated, and its dissolution is suppressed." -RP

    "The low carbon dioxide production of hypothyroidism (e.g., Lee and Levine, 1999), and the respiratory alkalosis of estrogen excess, are often overlooked. An adequate supply of calcium, and sometimes supplementation of salt and baking soda, can increase the tissue content of CO2." -RP


    “In hypothyroidism and diabetes, respiration is impaired, and lactic acid is formed even at rest, and relatively little carbon dioxide is produced. To compensate for the metabolic inefficiency of hypothyroidism, adrenalin and noradrenalin are secreted in very large amounts. Adrenalin causes free fatty acids to circulate at much higher levels, and the lactic acid, adrenalin, and free fatty acids all stimulate hyperventilation. The already deficient carbon dioxide is reduced even more, producing respiratory alkalosis." -RP

    Doctors can say anything they want but ultimately it comes down to the laws of chemistry.

    You're welcome. :)
     
  7. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks Sele for all the RP quotes. It seems you know a lot also about salbutamol/clenbuterol as well. Would appreciate if you have some information on them that I could use. I'd like to make a case to our doctor not to use salbutamol anymore on my mom whenever she gets hospitalized. If Salbutemol raises aderenaline, I'm also thinking it raises serotonin, doesn't it? In an interview which I can't dig up anymore, I recall RP saying that most of the serotonin in the body is removed in the lungs, by the action of superoxide dismutase. It makes me think that salbutamol does not help a person improve breathing, because its serotogenic effect is impeding a lung function of removing serotonin. An increase in serotonin levels, coupled with the increased lactic acid production and decreased CO2 production, makes breathing more difficult because of the extra effort needed for oxygenation of our tissues.

    Whether salbutamol is used or not depends on weighing its benefits vs. its bad effects. If a person doesn't have asthma or COPD, who could benefit from the dilation of the bronchial tubes, why would a doctor need to nebulize with salbutamel?
     
  8. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Even with asthma, I'm not even sure nebulization with salbutamol is that much needed. I've been on a Buteyko course and it even helps with asthma. Since that has a lot to do with carbon dioxide, I think use of carbogen may take the place of nebulization.
     
  9. sele

    sele Member

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    I agree.
    It's not easy to make your case with doctors. Their hands are tied by the system. I either refuse unnecessary treatment or stay away from them as much as possible.
     
  10. ddjd

    ddjd Member

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    so would supplementing SOD help reduce serotonin?
     
  11. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I really don't know but I can only guess, and my guess is that it's unlikely, otherewise Ray Peat would speak of using SOD supplements. But he mentioned the therapeutic effect of sea breeze, because of the presence of negative ions, which favors the production of superoxide dismutase in the lungs, and leads to it reducing serotonin levels. But there's a chance that he just neglected mentioning the use of SOD supplements, so it's a good question to direct at him.
     
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