Another View of Evolutionary Nutrition?

Discussion in 'Danny Roddy' started by Dan Wich, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. Dan Wich

    Dan Wich Member

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    Danny Roddy has just posted a new article, Another View of Evolutionary Nutrition?

    I like the observation that Paleo focuses on the conditions that may have influenced our evolution, rather than studying the systems that it observably equipped us with.
     
  2. jaguar43

    jaguar43 Member

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    The conditions that influence our evolution were created by the organism it self.

    It is well know that lions and tiger in the wild are disease free, but once taken out of its wild habitat it begins to degenerate quickly from one generation to the next. Its is well documented that lions and tigers eat only organ meats of its prey, never the muscle meat. Organs stimulate the metabolism by providing different nutrients and chemical compounds.

    Going back to paleo, I do not see a problem with the diet except that most low carbers are eating mostly muscle meat, which do not contain enough of the things that stimulated metabolism. ( skin, organs, gonads, blood)

    Basically the only mechanism of evolution that paleo seems to side with is natural selection. Though epigenetics are gaining popularity over the mendelian genetics that seem to promote an idea that the survival of the fittest was the only way an organism evolved. Natural Selection seem to have a lot of racial overtones in the early 1900's but it never explain the evolution of an organism itself, traits that organisms acquire can be change over time to meet the demands of the environment, examples are low thyroid, high estrogen serotonin due to social status, work conditions, availability of food, perception of success and failure (dogs that learn helplessness).

    Cellular respiration produces 34 atp and is made in the mitochodria. Glycolysis which is created in the cytoplasm is only produces 4 atp. The keto acids that are produce by burning fat are a high energy product, but the problem is that it breaks down fats that may contain polyunsaturated fats which can damage your liver and supress thyroid production. So by living off fat you still need many other things that the paleo diet does not allow.

    I think once you begin to study ray peat's work more throughly the point that danny roddy makes in his article will be more understanding.
     
  3. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Honestly if people think a ten thousand year old mechanism is better than a billion year old one, they should be called futurists, not paleos. Besides, insulin resistance exists purely because of the ice age, as the carb scarcity put selective pressure towards it. Europeans found out about agriculture quickly enough so that their genes weren't too compromised, luckily.

    By the way, a big part of the brain, some other tissues as well as the liver itself cannot use ketones at all. Even god damn Dave Asprey does huge carb ups in the weekend, telling people you need sugar for "mucose stability" or some crap like that. The "three day brain fog" people talk about is actually the brain going from very low ketone efficiency to only about a quarter of energy from sugar if I'm not mistaken; never more than that, though.
     
  4. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    I would like to add that ketone breakdown seems to imply at least some lactate production. Also adding to my distrust of delocalized energy production is the essence of what is "evolutionary diabetes". The hypoglycemia (or acetyl coa overload) might come from the environment rather than the disease of the mitochondria, but the adaptation to that is equal. Ketones would also lower blood ph, which is anti peat.
     
  5. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    IMO very low carb paleo for about a year and a half shifted my cellular respiration to a cancerous metabolism. The more I read from Peat the more clear this becomes. It is mistaken to think paleo is a benign eating program. I'm glad people like Roddy and Stone have spoken out against paleo because it seems to either break people down slowly or quickly, but break people down it does no question. What also amazes me that I kept it up for so long when the signs of breakdown were all around me and that was probably because a silly doctor told me to do it, and I listened.
     
  6. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I also played this game of 'doing better' if I didn't feel good there was always a built in good paleo reason. I kept paleo hopping looking to recapture that initial feeling of well-being but of course it never came because it was the normal 2-3 month catacholamine honeymoon that always wears off. When I think of the damage I did unwittingly I cringe. Why anyone charged with helping people heal would recommend this is beyond me. I think that was the last straw for me with doctors. I knew I had to figure something out quick and thankfully I discovered Peat! I'm sure younger people may be able to rebound from it easy but I was already compromised, middle age and on estrogen. What a complete recipe for disaster. I have a newfound respect for the healing capacity of my body after that nightmare.
     
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