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Animals Chat Just Like Humans, Consider It Very Rude To Be Interrupted

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Yet another study that shows how little difference (if any) there is between humans and other living, intelligent organisms. The study showed that not only do animals communicate verbally, but they also perform that dialogue very similarly to humans. They practice proper talking form and make a strong effort not to interrupt the other participant(s). And if interruptions do occur, the animals consider it very poor etiquette and usually abandon the "conversation". I think most politicians can lean quite a bit from just observing how animals behave. Apparently, the animal behavior is anything but...animalistic.

    Taking turns: bridging the gap between human and animal communication
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...naked-mole-rats-language-review-a8385691.html

    "...Two-way conversations like the ones that humans engage in are found throughout the animal kingdom, scientists have found. “Turn taking” has long been suggested as one of the key features that distinguishes human language from the noises made by our primate cousins. But a new review has suggested that everything from the rumbling noises made by elephants to the chirps made by naked mole rats follow the same turn-taking rules. The authors of the new study highlighted timing as a key feature of communicative turn-taking in both humans and animals. Some species were impatient chatterers as certain songbirds waited less than 50 milliseconds to "reply" during a conversation. At the other end of the scale, slow-talking sperm whales exchanged clicks with a gap of about two seconds between turns. Humans typically pause for about 200 milliseconds before responding in a two-way conversation and the scientists found that we are not the only species that consider it rude to interrupt. Both black-capped chickadees and European starlings practised "overlap avoidance" during turn-taking communication. Writing in the journal Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the scientists said: "If overlap occurs, individuals became silent or flew away, suggesting that overlapping may be treated, in this species, as a violation of socially accepted rules of turn-taking."
     
  2. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Excellent. Thanks
     
  3. cdg

    cdg Member

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    This is so neat wish we could understand what they are nattering about? I know in one of Dr Peat's letters he talks about communicating with a bird in his garden. A bird who wanted water and successfully got it!
     
  4. pimpnamedraypeat

    pimpnamedraypeat Member

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    I think thats why interspecies television shows are so important.

    Spongebob taught me that fish are just like us and they worry about going to work, getting driving licenses, making money, and all those other things people do to stay above water (hehe)
     
  5. Sobieski

    Sobieski Member

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    Would you be kind enough to elaborate on this? That's pretty interesting
     
  6. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Does krabby patty use coconut oil or did they cut costs :emoji_eyes:
     
  7. pimpnamedraypeat

    pimpnamedraypeat Member

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    Mr krabs is a cheapskate buts he's also suprisingly health concious. He uses krills oil I'm not sure the pufa content of that
     
  8. goodandevil

    goodandevil Member

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    What a horrible show for children
     
  9. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I was thinking if someone can make a short animated illustration of the idea that animals consider interrupting during conversation rude.

    I would like to share with all the people I know who have the habit of interrupting before I finish my first sentence.
     
  10. Aspekt

    Aspekt Member

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    This is the article; Intuitive knowledge and its development

     
  11. cdg

    cdg Member

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    Yes indeed, here you go:

    "Nesting birds often swoop at people or animals who get too close to their nest.
    Early last summer, I had noticed some blue jays that seemed to be acting defensive
    whenever I went into one part of the yard. On a very hot day at the end of summer,
    a couple of plump jays were squawking and apparently trying to get my attention
    while I was watering the front yard, and I idly wondered why they would be acting
    that way so late in the year. I had gone around the house to water things in the
    back yard, and the birds came over the house, and were still squawking, and trying
    to get my attention. I realized that their excitement didn't have anything to do with
    their nest, and looking more carefully, I saw that they were young birds. As it
    dawned on me that they were interested in the water squirting out of the hose, I
    aimed the stream up towards them, and they got as close to it as they could. Since
    the force of the stream might have hurt them, I put on a nozzle that made a finer
    spray, and the birds immediately came down to the lowest tip of the branch, where
    they could get the full force of the mist, holding out their wings, and leaning into the
    spray so that it ruffled their breast feathers. Their persistence had finally paid off
    when they got me to understand what they wanted, and they were enjoying the cool
    water. As new young birds, I don't know how they understood hoses and squirting
    water, but it was clear that they recognized me as a potentially intelligent being with
    whom they could communicate.

    For a person, that wouldn't have seemed like a tremendously inventive response to the hot weather, but for young birds that hadn't been out of the nest for long, it made it clear to me that there is more inventive intelligence in the world than is apparent to most academic psychologists and ethologists.

    Early porpoise researchers were surprised when a porpoise understood a sequence in which one tone was followed by two, and then by three, and answered by producing a series of four tones. The porpoise had discovered that people knew how to count."

    Extracted from: Intuitive knowledge and its development

    There are many more examples-so read the full article.
     
  12. A. squamosa

    A. squamosa Member

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  13. Sobieski

    Sobieski Member

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