Aging As A Consequence Of Intracellular Water Volume And Density

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  1. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    Aging as a consequence of intracellular water volume and density - ScienceDirect


    Aging as a consequence of intracellular water volume and density
    Author links open overlay panelDiegoBonattoaBruno CésarFeltesbJoice de FariaPolonib
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    Open Access funded by Brazilian Government
    Under an Elsevier user license
    open access

    Abstract
    Aging is the result of a gradual failure of physiological and/or biochemical pathways that culminates with the death of the organism. Until now, the causative factors of aging are elusive, despite the increasing number of theories that try to explain how aging initiates. Interestingly, aging cells show an increase in intracellular water volume, but this fact is barely explored in aging studies. All cells have a crowded cytoplasm, where the high concentration and proximity of macromolecules create an environment that excludes many small molecules, including water. In this crowded environment, water can be found in two states termed low density water (LDW), which shows low reactivity and has an ice-like structure, and high density water (HDW) that has a disorganized structure and is highly reactive. LDW predominates in a macromolecular crowded environment, while HDW is found only in microenvironments within cytoplasm. In this sense, we hypothesized that the failure in the water homeostasis mechanisms with time changes the equilibrium between LDW and HDW, increasing the concentration of intracellular HDW. Being reactive, HDW leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and disturbs the crowded cytoplasm environment, resulting in a diminished efficiency of metabolic reactions. Noteworthy, the cell becomes less prone to repair damage when the concentration of HDW increases with time, resulting in aging and finally death. Interestingly, some biological mechanisms (e.g., anhydrobiosis) reduce the concentration of intracellular water and prolong the life of cells and/or organisms. In this sense, anhydrobiosis and related biological mechanisms could be used as a platform to study new anti-aging therapies.

     
  2. michael94

    michael94 Member

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    good post
     
  3. AretnaP

    AretnaP Member

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    Didn't Pollack talk about this? He of course referred to the water as "structured" but that word is bad to use so they can't say it.
     
  4. SB4

    SB4 Member

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    Would deterium be high density because it is held closer to oxygen and protium be low density because its held further away,
    Therefore as we age our mitochondrial heteroplasmy rises which means more Deuterium less protium and therefore more HDW.
     
  5. jandrade1997

    jandrade1997 Member

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    I don't think that's what they mean by HDW and LDW, but even so, how does mitochondrial heteroplasmy result in more deuterium? Are there somehow nuclear reactions happening in the mitochondria?
     
  6. SB4

    SB4 Member

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    No, the matrix water of mitochondria is deuterium depleted. The faster your mitochondria run, the more TCA intermediates it can recycle its deuterium depeleted water with.
    As mito runs slower, TCA also does, this means more glycolosis using cytosolic water instead of recycled mito water (DDW). This means DNA, etc get more deuterated.
     
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