2 Quarts Of Milk Has 1.2 Mg Of Iodine; Enough To Suppress The Thyroid And Cause Acne In Many

Discussion in 'Doubts About Milk' started by brigadierbarty, Jul 6, 2017.

  1. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    Interesting, I am going to ask my Mennonite farmer how he sterilizes his cow's udders. I am going to guess iodine, but maybe not, thought I once heard him talk about H2O2, but can't remember for what use. Would be nice if there was a type of test strip that you could put into the milk to test iodine levels. Still in all, can't see myself giving up that fantastic raw milk, cheese, and butter he produces!
     
  2. Xisca

    Xisca Member

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    Yes we are lucky to have access to raw dairies!
    And that is just nice to take into account the possibility of this extra iodine in milk, as it prohibits from counting a sensitive element accurately!

    A good diet and a good staple can be damaged by the way it is processed!
    Well, iodide is different from iodine I think?
    So you had a guess and you want to check it out, fair enough.
    Who knows more about potassium iodide?
     
  3. nikolabeacon

    nikolabeacon Member

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  4. nikolabeacon

    nikolabeacon Member

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    I think that probably these things are more responsible for acne from dairy. My sincere/honest experience is that If I am under(even minor) stress from something I am always experiencing small acne from milk(both skimm and 2-3%) on my back and shoulders along with an increase in sebum and scalp itch if I drink more than 2-3 cups ..though I do not supplement with "some" supplements. And it is digested very well and surely acne are not from "puberty" since I stopped having that acne 2-3 years ago But when I was drinking more than 3 quarts my sleep detoriated and TSH went up to close to 1. Probably reaction to milk also depends on current composition of bacteria in the intestines in relation to quantity consumed.

    I will probably going to drink no more than 1-3 cups in the future since the only milk I can drink in larger amounts is 2 - 3 % and it is really unecessary increasing my fat intake .


    Milky Questions

    I saw some articles showing that estrogens(estradiol and oestrone that are equaly found in both whey and casein part) in milk are not a concern but other things might be involved when quantity is considerably increased.


    Interesting valuable posts
    A1 Vs A2 Milk - Is The Devil Really In The Milk?

    Estrogen In Milk


    Glutamic Acid Doubles Prolactin And Cortisol In Humans

    (This is not so connected to this but is worth considering because of the Serotonin/Prolàctin Melanoma Needs Glutamine To Grow And Dies Without It peat mentioned some melanoma.

    It seems also that milk can càuse depression amd Autistic behaviour in large quantities. Is this why many wants to move to Tropics and are even starting to look like Peat and why some people just can't escape the image of dr. Peat.

    Autism linked to gut dysfunction
    Explanation The Earth Is Flat, Intellectuals Weep

    https://raypeatforum.com/community/threads/high-levels-of-gluta mate-implicated-in-depression-suicide.4075/#post-49232 )



    Some people said that Vit A can "solve" acne from milk but I am not sure what is the mechanism behind that or if that also requires thyroid supp or extra vit D, E and K and other nutrients in supplemental toxic form.
     
  5. bornamachine

    bornamachine Member

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    I will chime in and say that milk brings back acne for me and used to much worse back in the day, same with eggs.
     
  6. Serene

    Serene New Member

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    Hey guys, I'm pretty new here, and new to Peat, but I just happened to listen to his Milk, calcium talk on EastWest Healing yesterday. A caller asked about acne and milk. He was pretty convinced that it was something in the cow's diet that the person was reacting to (try a different brand or source for your milk?), or that drinking the milk sped up the metabolism so much that the body might be becoming deficient in something else, particularly vitamin A (vitamin a is used to treat acne).

    I myself have had acne my whole life, which has gone away in the past few years, after cutting out the grains. I took iodine, and it did not give me acne.
     
  7. schultz

    schultz Member

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    Here is a study on Canadian cows: Iodine concentration in milk sampled from Canadian farms. - PubMed - NCBI

    "The mean iodine concentration in Canadian milk was 304 ± 8.4 μg/kg, with concentrations ranging from 54 to 1,902 μg/kg"

    1kg is approximately 1 litre. Definitely if you're consuming 1+ litres of milk a day you do not need to supplement iodine.

    The range is pretty large as well. I wonder if that's a result of some farms using an iodine teat dip? Or if the iodine is supplemented in the form of a salt lick, some cows may consume more? Also, rapeseed aka canola has things in it that cause iodine not to be absorbed, so it may depend on the feed as well.

    A German study said this: Iodine in the feed of cows and in the milk with a view to the consumer's iodine supply. - PubMed - NCBI

    "Despite a minor risk of too low or too high milk iodine content, on the German food market, the regular supply of iodine to the farm animals has transformed milk into an iodine carrier. Studies of bulk milk and consumer milk, respectively, from the period 1997–2012 demonstrated mean concentrations of between 94 and 122 μg iodine/kg milk"

    ------------------------------------------

    I'm not joining the iodine debate, but just thought I would post these for numbers references.
     
  8. schultz

    schultz Member

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    This would be my guess. I drink lots of milk and have no acne. My wife and a friend of mine also drink lots of milk and have no acne. Another thing we have in common is that we eat liver consistently (he comes over for dinner weekly and I make liver). I swear if I have not eaten liver for a few weeks (which is pretty rare) I will develop a pimple or two on my face. Maybe its the vitamin A in liver, or maybe it's a combination of vitamins and minerals, or something else even.
     
  9. passivity

    passivity Member

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    I drank 3 liters of milk per day during 6 months and didnt me gave acne.
     
  10. MyUsernameHere

    MyUsernameHere Member

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    It gave me acne when I was at my worst hormonally. If you can't handle milk, your health is probably in the toilet anyway...
     
  11. DuggaDugga

    DuggaDugga Member

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    I believe it's important to consider various qualities about the milk that might be pertinent to hormones and potential disruption of the pilosebaceous unit:
    • was the cow grass-fed or grain-fed?
    • are there added vitamins. If so, how sure can we be that the vitamins don't contain expiates?
    • was the animal treated with hormones?
    • how was the animal raised; pastured or jammed into a commercial farm?
    If our diet, lifestyle, and hormones (endogenous and exogenous) influence our energetic state, I dare say that the same is true for other animals and what we consume of them.

    In my teenage years I remember thinking milk and chocolate were the causes of my acne. I now consume both those things (lots of the former) and have no issues; maybe the best skin of my life. The difference now is that I get raw milk from a farmer who pastures their cows, and I eat chocolate void of soy lecithin, seed oils, and other potential agents that might disrupt my endocrine system. "Milk is good for me" or "milk is bad for me" type statements I feel miss critical details
     
  12. DuggaDugga

    DuggaDugga Member

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    I actually started working on a paper regarding acne, with a section on the importance of retinoids. I've been distracted with other interests as of late, so it's slow-moving. However, I have formulated a bit of an opinion:
    The sebocytes are complex and sensitive, going through an at least partially retoid-regulated maturation process that results in holocrine secretion, the rupture of the cell and release of its contents which are a complex mix of waxes and other lipid molecules that provide our skin with protection from the sun, pathogen invasion, and water-proofing, among other things.
    Retinol (-0l for alcohol) gets converted to retinal (-al for aldehyde) which gets converted into the active metabolite retoinic acid; more specifically, all-trans-retinoic acid. Isomers have been patented, such as isotretinoin (Accutane), 13-cis-retinoic acid which may act by inhibiting sebocytes (and other cells) from receiving the all-trans-retinoic acid's signal to differentiate. So, what you get are sebaceous glands that don't go through their normal holocrine secretion- less acne, but less benefits of the secretions. I think this is also why Accutane causes abortions and deformed babies, as all-trans-retnoic acid is critically important in the development of the fetus' brain.
    Unsaturated fats have also been shown to find to the "receptors" RAR, RXR. I think they may play a role in disrupting the normal maturation process of the cell, possibly oxidizing its lipid contents as well. I think prolactin and cortisol also play critical roles in the excessive and dysregulated degranulation of the sebocytes.

    More to come when I decide to get back around to it.

    I have a good list of references, but here is one I enjoyed the most:
    Endogenous retinoids in the hair follicle and sebaceous gland
     
  13. nikolabeacon

    nikolabeacon Member

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    I think you should also consider what one member said here about vit A.Neonatal Hypothyroidism Due To Mothers VEGAN Diet

    Btw i am sure i will not going to drink more than 1-3 cups of milk(or equivalent in other dairy) anymore. Because more than that will provide you nothing usefull or magical in fact it only can cause various problems that I just briefly summed up. Acne from large quantities of milk are tightly connected to those links (various things bounded to casein) , crazy amounts of tryptophan and P. (Serotonin/prolactin). Fixing things with supplements means that you made wrong dietary choices.
     
  14. DuggaDugga

    DuggaDugga Member

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    Thanks for the link. I bookmarked the "Vitamins as hormones" article for a proper read.

    Ever since being introduced to the bioenergetic view of the organism it's made a good deal of sense to me how molecules outside of what has been traditionally view as hormones could have hormonal-like effects on the cell, as they're indicating what is occurring elsewhere in the organism; lactic acid and vitamin A particularly comes to mind.

    I cannot say that I've personally read up on the presence of hormones in milk, though I'd guess it varies greatly based on the cow's state and I'm guessing those considerations haven't been addressed in research. I can say that I definitely crave it, particularly with phosphate-heavy meals or after physical activity. Up to four cups is the norm for me, with no adverse effects to report since changing to raw milk from a pasture-grazing animal. It wouldn't surprise me if direct ancestry plays a role; being of Norwegian descent might set me up for a dairy-heavy diet.

    I totally agree with your last statement re: supplementation. We don't have the biochemistry of food all figured out, so thinking a multivitamin contains everything we need is reckless. The expiates likely make most of them more of a detriment than benefit anyways.
     
  15. rei

    rei Member

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    If you look how iodine levels have fallen over the decades and how previously doctors used to treat hypothyroidism with iodine supplementation i think it is awfully convenient that once thyroid hormone entered the market the old ways to treat and diagnose were forgotten/suppressed.

    Anyone can easily make sure how badly their body actually needs iodine by taking an iodine load test and in addition to iodine measure how much it makes you pee out bromide. As long as significant bromide levels are measured you need large amounts of iodine and certain other nutrients per day to safely flush it out. In certain countries that use much bromide supplementation in food products the accumulated levels can be close to poisoning and it will be a lengthy process to safely detox. If iodine supplementation or thyroid hormone treatment has a weird effect on you this can very well be your problem.
     
  16. bohogirl

    bohogirl Member

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    I've suffered from acne all my life. I'm an adult. And I'm still suffering. Not regular acne but cystic, sometimes very deep. Acne that caused horrible scarring.

    Dairy seems to give me acne. However, I can drink all the low fat kefir in the world and not get acne. I haven't tried low fat milk to see the effect but half and half gives me acne right away. I've tried Whole milk kefir, a different brand than usual, and think it caused some acne. Is it the fat content? Maybe.

    I've also used betadine topically and it helps the smaller acne.

    I did try lugols topically and haven't reached a conclusion yet. It might've caused swollen lymph nodes and it might've caused bigger cysts. Not totally sure on that. I was going to try it internally but put it off because I'm scared of more breakouts.

    I wouldn't say I have sufficient iodine levels. I mean I avoid practically everything. My diet is very deficient.

    I have read some people used iodine to treat their cystic acne.
     
  17. sladerunner69

    sladerunner69 Member

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    That's only true of milk produced from bovine fed with seaweed.
     
  18. Travis

    Travis Member

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    I just noticed that eggs can do it too.

    Steroid hormones, and specifically androgens, seem like the most likely culprit since they stimulate the sebaceous gland in vitro. Nothing that I've seen seems to influence the sebaceous gland more strongly.
    Cordain, Loren, et al. "Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization." Archives of dermatology 138.12 (2002): 1584-1590.

    Never thought I would cite a Loren Cordain article.

    Acne is a reported side-effect of androgenic steroids 43% of the time, according to an article in Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft:
    Melnik, Bodo, Thomas Jansen, and Stephan Grabbe. "Abuse of anabolic‐androgenic steroids and bodybuilding acne: an underestimated health problem." JDDG: Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft 5.2 (2007): 110-117.
     
  19. Travis

    Travis Member

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    There are dozens of studies showing a cholesterol-lowering effect of kefir and yogurt.
    Some people had speculated that this bacteria was actually producing a cholesterol-inhibiting drug, but the most intuitive and simple explanation is that Lactobacillus acidophilus actually metabolizes cholesterol directly. A study was undertook* partly to determine this:
    milk1.png
    Interesting. The bacteria is taking-up cholesterol. There has also been studies on the cholesterol content of different dairy products.† Yogurt is very low in cholesterol:
    milk3.png
    Now, you might expect yogurt to be nearly identical to—or higher than—milk. I think whole milk is generally used to make yogurt.

    I think that Lactobacillus acidophilus is actually metabolizing the cholesterol. All of the androgens are rather similar to cholesterol and could be metabolized in the same way.
    [​IMG]

    So you might expect parallel reductions in the other steroid hormones—including androgens—in yogurt and kefir.

    *Gilliland, S. E., C. R. Nelson, and C. Maxwell. "Assimilation of cholesterol by Lactobacillus acidophilus." Applied and environmental microbiology 49.2 (1985): 377-381.
    †Paradkar, Manish M., and Joseph Irudayaraj. "Determination of cholesterol in dairy products by infrared techniques: 2. FT‐NIR method." International journal of dairy technology 55.3 (2002): 133-138.
     
  20. Travis

    Travis Member

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