1. Cocoa Butter - Organic & Fair Trade Certified
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. **NEW** BL11 - Orange, Red & Infrared Therapy Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Charcoal Soap - For Deep Cleansing
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Orange & Red Light Therapy Device - LGS1
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Organic Cocoa Powder
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Metabasoap - Handcrafted Soap
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Cascara Sagrada Powder From Farmalabor In Italy
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  8. **NEW Mini Body Light** MBL1 - Orange & Red Light Therapy Mini Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice

101 Year Old Fred Kummerow Exercised A Lot And Eats Whole Grains, Oatmeal, And Vegetables

Discussion in 'Breaking News' started by Westside PUFAs, Dec 18, 2015.

  1. heartnhands

    heartnhands Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2016
    Messages:
    169
    Gender:
    Female
    Congratulations on your health! I can't read your results on my devise but I trust they show something significant. Would you mind explaining how you came to buy and use the tool? I've always wondered about gas spectoscepy and it's ability to be used for diagnosis, I met someone who sold them and claimed his best clients were medical doctors in Germany.
     
  2. postman

    postman Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    542
    If you eat just 100g of oats you've already broken the 4 grams of unsaturated fat limit. The saturated fat to unsaturated fat ratio is like 1:4 in oats.
     
  3. EIRE24

    EIRE24 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2015
    Messages:
    1,663

    I think that statement is ridiculous. Oatmeal isnt ideal but you see millions of people eating it daily especially all the gym go-ers and bodybuilders and they seem in very good health. No one eats mayonaise in large quantities and if they did, you'd see their health deteriorate by the day.
     
  4. tara

    tara Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    9,720
    Gender:
    Female
    According to nutritiondata:
    100g rolled oats ~ 2.3g PUFA
    1/2 cup <1g PUFA
    Also about 13% protein, and fibre that may feed bacteria, but may also help carry away estrogen (and maybe also some of it's own PUFA?)/
    I don't know how to assess nutrition data's stats - maybe your source is more reliable/better verified?
    I'm not recommending oats as optimal health food for everyone, but there are a lot of worse choices.
     
  5. New_to_Peat

    New_to_Peat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    I guess if you count the monounsaturated fat as PUFA, then it's 4 grams. Of course, 4 grams of PUFA seems like an arbitrary limit. Some people might want to stay under 2 grams or less, others might be happy at 10 or less.

    I like exercise/activity. The distinction between the two is important for some. Regardless, training year in and year out for marathons probably isn't great for health, but going for walks, or bike rides, or kayaking with friends and family out in nature? Even if it is slightly damaging to my physical health (and I don't believe it is), it's great for my mind.
     
  6. tca300

    tca300 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2013
    Messages:
    1,444
    Gender:
    Male
    It seems like he mostly swam and road his bicycle for exercise. Which both happen to be concentric based muscle contractions, which is according to Peat, and studies, healthy and restorative to the mitochondria. I don't know how he drank all that whole milk... I don't care for it at all.
     
  7. kaybb

    kaybb Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2015
    Messages:
    292
    Looks like Fred's diet is missing corn oil, soy oil, canola oil, margarine, etc...
     
  8. chispas

    chispas Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2014
    Messages:
    354
    Not sure what you mean sorry.

    I just think everyone should really try and listen to their own bodies, use Ray Peat as a bit of a lens/rule of thumb, but not as a rigid rule book. I think we all have the ability to do well within a spectrum of different nutritional and environmental conditions, we just need to find what works for us. Everyone has tolerances to different things. You have to keep a log and just keep checking in with yourself.

    Ask yourself the classic Simone Weil question, "what are you going through?" and just keep a record of how you feel, and what you are consuming. I think the trick is to not do anything that even slightly contributes to a negative response in your body. It's tricky to judge this, but you can use a combination of experiential, subjective feelings, body temp/heart rate, and a blood test. Personally I find bowel movements to be a more important metric of general health than anything - if you have uncomfortable, irregular, or varied bowel movements, this could be a signal that your body isn't too happy - although it can take a couple of days for the 'weather' to change in the Department of Bowel Movements, so you have to be patient. I sometimes wonder about models/actors eating all that chia seed and kale health crap that they consume - all that seed/nut/grain fibre is just brutal to pass!

    People on this forum have criticised me for changing my diet around on a whim, and although their criticisms are correct, they don't speak to my actual experience. My experience tells me that if the effects of a nutritional change are immediate and negative, and reproducible, I should not persist with it, and instead continue to slightly change the diet until I get a good balance. Persisting with foods that upset you is tedious and silly, and can make things worse. Think about why the food is bothering you, do some research, or refer to Ray Peat, and then make an intelligent change in your behaviour.

    In fact, if there is one thing that is sort of missing from the Ray Peat Forum, it is a troubleshooting guide to experimenting on your own body in this subjective way.
     
  9. chispas

    chispas Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2014
    Messages:
    354
    If you look at what all of the centenarians and super-centenarians seem to have in common, they all seem pretty particular about what they like to eat and what they don't. And they seem to just continually consume these same things as part of a fairly consistent, ongoing routine.

    Ray Peat has found some good reasons to consume milk and orange juice, limit meat and eliminate PUFA, drink coffee, keep sugar levels and protein levels up, and get enough anti-inflammatory compounds to mitigate any red herrings that he might accidentally encounter as part of living in a volatile urban environment. This is all good thinking - theoretical of course. In practice, things are going to be different for everyone and this forum proves that.

    I travelled to Vietnam recently, a place where the average life expectancy is about 76 years. 8 years lower than the USA at 82. Nevertheless, there is not a fat person to be seen there. I had to really scrutinise the crowds of people around me in Hanoi to find someone who looked big, and if I did, they were always a tourist, not a local. You would be shocked to know that PUFA is consumed in abundance in Vietnam. Oxidised, old, smelly fish sauce on every ******* thing there, and in almost every single dish! And not to mention the addition of MSG in great quantities that is sprinkled on for extra flavour! I mean, I even heard someone complain that they ate some MSG-free chicken skewers and it just didn't taste as good...

    It was practically impossible to avoid PUFA in Vietnam. I even attended a 'supermarket' with imported packaged goods, and again, was there anything for sale that didn't contain PUFA? I ended up buying jelly beans for a snack, because there was literally nothing else. By that stage I was also tired of drinking soda.

    One tour operator did tell me that when the men in Vietnam want to feel strong and tough, they go and eat oysters...so maybe the zinc content lifts their testosterone temporarily.
     
  10. bzmazu

    bzmazu Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,160
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Corozal, Belize
    Excellent comments....
     
  11. PTP

    PTP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Messages:
    42
    I know it's an old thread, and Dr Kummerow's exercise has already been covered positively, but I think it's important to point out that he exercises every day. Someone who does that is not going to push their body to stressful limits because they need to be fresh the next day. Cycling 2 miles is pretty low intensity - that's a reasonable walking distance, unless he's sprinting it or going up hills. Swimming can also be leisurely, which I imagine it is if he's doing it for an hour. In ayurveda they recommend exercise every day, but never beyond 50% of your capability.
     
  12. Xisca

    Xisca Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2015
    Messages:
    2,212
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Canary Spain
    1) Scotish people did fine with what they had, oat especially. Maybe a diet is a whole, and also fine when you ate it all your life.
    I personnaly condemn only processed food in a way that it is deteriorated at chemical level + bad ways of cooking = home processing.
    2) For the same reasons, I see nothing wrong with mayonnaise, and I see it even good!
    - It depends on the ingredients.... I have made mayonnaise with ghee and coconut oil, appart from olive oil. I always use fresh eggs and eat it the same day, that is not the same as "from the bottle".
    There is a HUGE advantage of mayonnaise over any oil: it is an emulsion, which saves the job of doing so with bilis.
    That is also why sesame seeds or sunflower seed are not as bad as their oil or "butter", which have their oils extracted from the natural emulsion of the seed.
     
  13. dbh25

    dbh25 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Gender:
    Male
    My bag of Bob's Red Mill steel cut oats has per 44g (.25 cup) 3 g fat, .5 g saturated, 0g trans fat. Does that mean 2.5g is all PUFA? This is one serving for me.
     
  14. PeatThemAll

    PeatThemAll Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Messages:
    280
  15. dbh25

    dbh25 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Gender:
    Male
  16. encerent

    encerent Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Messages:
    573
    He's also probably not running marathons, doing triathlons when he's talking about exercise. He might just be doing a relaxing walk outside for 30-60 mins a day.
     
  17. paymanz

    paymanz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Messages:
    2,617
    Gender:
    Male
    Decent protein and carb intake.fruit , vegetables ,dairy.

    Pufa intake is not peaty but seems lower than average.
     
  18. Peater Piper

    Peater Piper Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2016
    Messages:
    520
    Gender:
    Male
    Cronometer lists a quarter cup of steel cut oats as having 2.6 grams of fat. .9 PUFA, .8 mono, and .4 saturated. The numbers don't quite add up, but I assume you're getting about a gram to 1.25 g of PUFA. In the Peat scheme of things, that's a high PUFA food, but if your total PUFA remains around 4 or 5 grams then I wouldn't fret over it. Plus oats are known as a good bile binder, so some of that fat probably avoids absorption.
     
  19. dbh25

    dbh25 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Gender:
    Male
    Thanks for the info. I eat eggs as well, that container lists for 1 egg: 5 g fat, 1.5 saturated. Is that 3.5 g PUFA per egg?
    I have steel cut oats a few times per week, and almost never any high PUFA seed oils. I seem to digest the steel cut oats well.
     
  20. Peater Piper

    Peater Piper Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2016
    Messages:
    520
    Gender:
    Male
    Here's the info for eggs. Hopefully most of that 3.5 grams is monounsaturated fat, but it really depends on what the chickens are being fed, so I don't know how trustworthy the nutrition information is. You're probably getting more PUFA from the eggs than from the oats, though with the oats you're getting phytic acid and whatnot, but it doesn't sound like oats are a staple and you seem to do well with them so enjoy. :):

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/111/2
     
Loading...